What we do| Get involved| Membership| About PIIN| News and Events| Get inspired

 

 

Welcome to PIIN

The Pennsylvania Interfaith Impact Network (PIIN) is a network of congregations and organizations in Southwestern Pennsylvania committed to drawing together people of faith to act powerfully on local and regional issues of justice and fairness through the process of community-building, direct action, and negotiation with decision makers.

Join us for our Love Thy Neighbor campaign! Our initial focus is the need for Pittsburgh’s largest employer, UPMC, to pay their service workers a living wage. Thousands of UPMC service employees work full-time, without any hope of earning enough to sustain their families, let alone enough to improve their economic standing over time. Although UPMC is Pittsburgh’s largest employer, it is not a creator of prosperity for working people. In addition, UPMC’s tax breaks include not paying property taxes, a major source of school funding, which is devastating our schools. As we have learned from the story of the Good Samaritan, let us take action and be Good Samaritans within our Pittsburgh community. Read more

.  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 

Here’s the latest from our “PIIN in the News Media” (Read more)

October 9: PIIN President offers opening comments at Bob Herbert’s new book launch at Carnegie Mellon

PIIN president Richard Freeman offered the opening remarks during the national book launch event of Bob Herbert’s latest book, “Losing Our Way: An Intimate Portrait of a Troubled America,” held at Carnegie Mellon University. PIIN was a co-sponsor of the event.  View the event flier | Read the coverage 


September 4, 2014: Coverage on Pittsburgh’s fast-food workers’ non-violent civil disobedience #StrikeFastFood  PIIN supported the recent efforts of local fast food workers at their strike and non-violent civil disobedience action. View photos from the event

.  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  . 

July 30, 2014: “6 cited for trespassing on UPMC property at union rally”  Protesters sat on the floor, prayed and sang to support a group of janitors who claim they were fired last month from UPMC for supporting other employees who want to unionize. Rev. Ronald Wanless, a retired Methodist pastor who led churches in McKeesport, Clairton and the North Side, works with the Pennsylvania Interfaith Impact Network. Read the full coverage in the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review

.  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .