Pittsburghers call on PWSA to improve water quality and service

At the Pittsburgh Water and Sewer Authority board meeting earlier today, there wasn’t an empty seat in the house. While many were there to simply witness the board proceedings in light of recent high-profile incidents, including reports of high lead levels, nearly a dozen called on the board to improve the city’s water quality.

In rebuttal: Privatization is not the answer to PWSA’s problems

Speaking for a coalition of environmental organizations, faith groups, community-based nonprofits and Pittsburgh Water and Sewer Authority ratepayers, we are deeply concerned about our region’s water quality and want to ensure that the public has maximum control over our water. PWSA must provide clean and affordable water to Pittsburgh residents, and it’s critical that changes be made to the authority to accomplish these goals.

Long-planned sermons on gun violence take on new urgency

When a group of Christian organizations teamed with the Allegheny County Health Department in recent months to ask pastors to talk in their sermons Sunday about preventing gun violence, they were thinking mainly about the relentless beat of killings and other assaults, injuries and trauma affecting the families and neighborhoods of the victims.

Group envisions ‘A Pittsburgh That Works for Working People’

Labor advocates gathered Monday at the August Wilson Center for a panel discussion on the recently released report, “A Pittsburgh that Works for Working People.” The study, conducted by the Center on Wisconsin Strategy, included a series of recommendations they believe would improve the lives of Pittsburghers. The panel, which included economists, service workers and religious and elected leaders, discussed what steps the city would need to take to implement the proposals.

A new report foresees a Pittsburgh that works for working people

Yesterday, the August Wilson Center hosted a community panel focused on finding solutions to the city’s affordable housing, civil rights, economic development, job and transportation woes. The forum revolved around findings presented in A Pittsburgh That Works for Working People, a new report by the Center on Wisconsin Strategy (COWS) examining how these issues impact Pittsburgh and its future. The panel featured economists, local community leaders and elected officials, as well as representatives from the service workers’ union 32BJ SEIU.